You be the Judge

Written by nopadon wongpakdee. Posted in MMT Featured, Technique and Training

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Published on September 07, 2013 with 13 Comments

MMT friend and leading UK Muay Thai Judge Tony Myers needs your help. Dr. Myers and his team are working on a study on scoring and he needs your input.  If you get a moment, and you think you know your way around combat scoring have a go.

Message from Tony:

Who do you think wins this fight?

The fight game has been littered with controversial decisions that have left fans outraged, and bewildered by the judges’ call. From the outrageous Roy Jones vs. Park Si-Hun in the 1988 Olympics, through the richly disputed Hagler vs. Leonard battle, to more recent MMA controversies such as Galvao vs. Warren or Machida vs. Rua I. Muay Thai is no exception with some hotly disputed decisions across the globe.

We would like you and other fight fans to help us discover what makes fight decisions fair or totally outrageous.

If you would like to help us your participation will take approximately 16 minutes in total and involve you watching a 15 minute video of a Muay Thai match. After watching the match, you will be asked who you think won the match and, when you are given the actual decision, rate how fair you think the decision was.

To give us your opinion of who wins and what you think of the decision click on the link below.

http://tinyurl.com/my5gknp

(The study is being conducted by Dr. & Mohammed Rehman- Newman University, UK. Dr Nigel Balmer -University College London, UK, and Stephen Strotmeyer – University of Pittsburgh, USA)

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13 Comments

There are currently 13 Comments on You be the Judge. Perhaps you would like to add one of your own?

  1. Interesting study and I have to admit I thought Red won that…

    Interested to receive any feedback on what the rest of you guys thought though.

  2. red did win that

  3. turned the commentary off most of the fight.

  4. I felt there’s a strong argument for a draw as it goes.

  5. blue landed a couple[literally a couple] effective punches, and did maybe two or three clear scoring off balancing techniques the whole fight. his kicks were shit save for a few leg kicks. the thai dominated him with body kicks and did massive damage during the clinch where he landed a whole lot of solid knees. knees and effective body kicks dont score higher than what the blue corner did? still dont understand why they want you to turn the commentary on. to obviously make you biased?

  6. it is funny how different people,see the same fight tho isnt it. I felt the clinch was fairly even with the thai just about edging it but no real difference, nearly all of the thais tecniques had no effect/did not move the red guy.I saw the thai being thrown enough for him to lose the rounds he was thrown in.If you look at the fight as a whole id say round 1 was aa draw, red takes 2, the thai takes 3, english guy wins 4 by a long long way. The thai does possibly just about edge round 5, but i felt that round was possibly a draw aswell. i think that was a tough fight to score as it goes.The thai was exhausted and on the back foot form round 2 aswell

  7. i didnt judge by round format. ha. and im wondering if all refs do.

  8. i mean judges, not refs.

    • thats a tricky point to, i believe they do and they dont depending on the fight. I mean if 3,4,5 are even then they do look to the first 2 rounds to see if they can decide a winner.Assuming the thai did edge the 5th then that and round 3 should be enough usually to secure the win. Im just not sure if he did win the 5th? It was a pretty rubbish fight so I cant be bothered watching it again!haha

  9. I think what is going to be interesting is when the conductors of this study look at what people have answered in regards to who won this match is “Does experience have greater bearing on how we decide the outcome of the fight (as we maybe compare it to something else) or do we solely judge the winner on what we see in the fight.
    In that regard by listening to the commentary are we swayed by what we are hearing and not necessarily on what we are seeing.
    I would be interested to know if the same outcome was given if a referee from Muay Thai, K1, Kickboxing or Shoot boxing was watching the match.
    How would they individually argue their cases for who won or lost.. If you view the fight from purely a Thai boxing background I would still argue that Red won. However, if someone from a K1 background could argue every hit wold score would that then mean Blue won.
    What do you guys reckon?

    • its a muay thai match and should be judged accordingly.It doesnt matter what your own personal fight background is on who you think should of won.Thats an entirely different matter.If someone is watching that fight and asked to say whose won then the person then judging has to judge it with muay thai criteria as thats what the fight was.

  10. I thought red took that. It was close at points, the exchanges going back and forth and blue did sweep red a number of times but I think red took it in the clinch and edged him out in the fifth round as well. Especially as red was able to land more of difficult blows (he landed an elbow in the 3rd? and repeated kicks) while blue mainly punched and did inside leg kicks.

    SE as part of the study you were supposed to keep the commentary on if you were assigned to it. My video had no commentary. There have been studies that show that judges are swayed by audience noise and participation in the same way the study here is trying to emulate that influence by having the commentary on.

  11. This match was not close at all, really. Neither fighter was particularly good, but the Thai won this one easily, seeing as the farang didn’t even know he was being outpointed. The Thai imposed his rhythm and controlled the match better, landing tons of knees (scoring well up the middle) and unanswered body kicks – the farang chose not to defend or reply with equally-valued attacks, in most cases. The Thai was never in danger and while he was not particularly skilled, it came down to him understanding how the game is played and scored while his opponent wasn’t sure what he wanted to do except wait for some opportunistic punches. He off-balanced the Thai several times, but it was not enough to make up for the deficit he was running.

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